Identity

Posted on September 11, 2016 · Posted in Identität

Identities are important, whether for different projects and own tasks, responsible for differences, to be recognized as a solution or even political crisis as read almost daily in newspapers, blogs and articles. Identities are not just moving the newspaper lately, they also have an important part in the European literature.

But what is the secret behind a psychological concept, strongly in conflict and dispute and apparently without much interest and argumentative strength?

Fictional identities are not just topics in books and stories, but also very important because identities are subject to threatening situations, in learning environments, signing or branding. Using IT or Internet with higher ambitions is a modern example of how social identities are important when personal ideas and scientific outcomes need to be made understandable and perhaps accountable. 

News from the last weeks comes with a few important lessons, which is really important when social identities are characterized by a public interest. Identities are subject to an increasing amount of advertising due to a growing interest in personal data. In the February issue of the Harvard Business Review, an article is published arguing that social identities are important because they are subject to heavy investment for example when teams promote sports, service deals or even a typical buy in my preferred supermarket. As mentioned in the article, when discussing the role of social identities, decisions of an individual are often justified by the positions within a society rather than as a personal result.

Social identities are triggered and postponed between occasions. Within a second, I'm almost certainly convinced that better food is the problem solver for a bad mood, but the next moment I'm convinced I'm more into a sport than a better problem solver.

The article in the Harvard Business Review is worth mentioning several facts about how marketers can promote efficient social identities, highlighting identities and behaving most apt to inspire consumer choices. This happens in all kind of usual situations, for example, when the differences between two radio stations become more significant and consequences are to be expected.

That this perceptual change is not very difficult to achieve is emphasized in the article when the article points to prominent social experiments and proves that significant changes take place within seconds as they are triggered.

Girl names are today a matter of social identities, the New York Times reported in June. An Upshot analysis by the New York Times and the Pew Research Center in 2014 shows that in the last 2 years, about 20% of women have kept their maiden name. The datasets of the last 30 years have an increasing trend with a decline between 1970 and 1980 by minus 3%.

The Upshot is a new project and a good example of a data-driven journalism. The Upshot is designed as an interactive portal of the New York Times. The Upshot was launched in April 2014 and then marketed much cheaper than other newspapers based on comparable methods and principles. David Leonhardt, editor-in-chief, describes "The Upshot" as a project with information for people who need answers to spend the rest of their lives better and be open to data-driven lifestyle attitudes.

In a study by Google Consumer and a team from The Upshot showed that last year around 29.5% of married women kept their maiden name. One explanation is the increasing professionalism and interest of women in careers. Giving up her maiden name is often too complex for her successful professional and social media identity.

Aggregated social identities in the form of numbers, numbers, and codes can also have very negative and threatening character, as outlined in an article in Forbes. Social identities as part of the medical sector are grouped together as medical identities and are subject to the highest security issues. As the article cites, data on over 92 million patients are affected by security breaches and hacking. That's a total of 42.5% of medical data in 2014. This percentage is the highest number of hacking in related industries.

Personal information ranges from credit card numbers, billing information and social security numbers. One of the most common reasons people steal and hijack personal information is criminal intent, according to statistics published by the Ponemon Institute. That this perceptual change is not very difficult to achieve is emphasized in the article when the article points to prominent social experiments and proves that significant changes take place within seconds as they are triggered.

Girl names are today a matter of social identities, the New York Times reported in June. An Upshot analysis by the New York Times and the Pew Research Center in 2014 shows that in the last 2 years, about 20% of women have kept their maiden name. The datasets of the last 30 years have an increasing trend with a decline between 1970 and 1980 by minus 3%.

The Upshot is a new project and a good example of a data-driven journal. The Upshot is designed as an interactive portal of the New York Times. The Upshot was launched in April 2014 and then marketed much cheaper than other newspapers based on comparable methods and principles. David Leonhardt, editor-in-chief, describes "The Upshot" as a project with information for people who need answers to spend the rest of their lives better and be open to data-driven lifestyle attitudes.

In a study by Google Consumer, a team from The Upshot showed that last year around 29.5% of married women kept their maiden name. One explanation is the increasing professionalism and interest of women in careers. Giving up her maiden name is often too complex for her successful professional and social media identity.

Aggregated social identities in the form of numbers, numbers, and codes can also have very negative and threatening character, as outlined in an article in Forbes. Social identities as part of the medical sector are grouped together as medical identities and are subject to the highest security issues. As the article cites, data on over 92 million patients are affected by security breaches and hacking. That's a total of 42.5% of medical data in 2014. This percentage is the highest number of hacking in related industries.

Personal information ranges from credit card numbers, billing information and social security numbers. One of the most common reasons people steal and hijack personal information is criminal intent, according to statistics published by the Ponemon Institute. Social identities are not just a matter of public fraud, but are also the subject of major studies, such as those published by Evanthia Botsari, Margeret Lynn, Kathleen White, or Keri Kettle impacting various areas of interest.

Evanthia Botsari has analyzed the results of IT projects and found solid arguments on how these differences can explain how self - confidence is interwoven and how this knowledge can be harnessed for new projects. Albert Bandura developed a self-concept in the middle of 1970 that structures the ability of different people to organize and execute plans. Such self-experiences are confirmed in the following decades in experiments such as with real experiences, verbal beliefs and physiological indices.

Based on these findings, Evanthia Botsari has developed a network model of how learning uses social concepts and anthropomorphic properties of the environment and how it is linked to each other in the use of IT. Especially in the development of information services and acquisition skills, such anthropomorphic human characteristics are powerful. Learning outcomes are most effective when learning a positive core competency and perceiving the environment as controllable. People with less self-confidence when dealing with information systems experience a feeling of limited control. A higher level of self-awareness of creativity contrasts with higher self-esteem and global self-efficacy. Self-identities are important in gaining knowledge and achieving significant change only when trust in IT-dominated environments has reached a confident and creative emotional state.

Margaret Lynn has studied self-identities in other areas of achievement, mainly to explain how self-identities are used to explain causality, the impact of unbelief on the sense of control over one's actions. She tested the hypothesis that the disbelieving belief in free will reduces the components between an agent and environment control.

Several new findings were published in her study. The manipulation of free will beliefs is, as she says, most likely by intervening on an early or pre-reflexive level, thus making implicit self-concepts so powerful that they succeed with less intentional effort, a reduced sense of agency and small feelings of responsibility unlike acts of diminishing belief in free will, as you can read in the 2014 study.

Kathleen White has established the link between brand features and consumer social identities. In its terminology, Pepsi is associated with a male gender identity that is shown with the slogan "Maximum taste, no sugar and possibly scorpion venom." Pepsi Max, the first diet coke for men ".

In 4 studies, she has proven that people generally avoid a product-related identity if their social identity is threatened when they buy the product. This effect is very strong when the independent self is activated by threats.

An independent self is given when the observed actions are unique, autonomous, and almost unrelated to the behaviors of others. However, interdependent selves affect each other as soon as they are activated by threats. This difference is important when self-concepts are activated with an advertisement, as the above-mentioned motto.

Keri Kettle has shown that such a social identity is powerful when activated with the signing of documents, such as in contracts, in stores, or on various other customer and consumer occasions. He has conducted four studies in various settings to test when such effects are meaningful and when signing has no real impact. The signature of your own name has implications for product information review.

When signing while searching for products, even more product information is collected. If the person is more closely connected to the product area, more engagement with a particular product group will be triggered. Signing increases engagement, which results in more time spent in stores and more products being tested.

Lamy, one of the leading product brands, uses identities as the desired reason for success and positive attitude. Founded in the 1960s, Lamy is one of the smartest brands today when I need a clever stylus. As one of the world's well-known brands, Lamy knows how he can deliver unfolding qualities with an affordable pricing policy. Since the late 1960s, when Lamy opted for a different and more design-oriented style, the company produced a dozen distinctive products in 1966, such as the Lamy 2000, the starting point for a firm striving for reputation and strong design. The Lamy 2000, designed as Lamy's earliest branded product and built to Bauhaus principles, was superseded in 1974 as a premium product with the "cp1" pen, a pen with no clear cuts, followed by product highlights such as the "Safari" and " pico ".

Today, Lamy designs pens exclusively designed by designers such as Richard Sapper, Naoto Fukuyama or design studios such as EOOS, an Austrian design company. As one of the companies using depth of product as a well-known feature, Lamy emphasizes its appearance as a brand that maintains perfect tensions between identities and differences, one of the distinctive opposites of brand sophistication, as Peter Zec said in an interview with brandEINS.